BCM News Archives - The Birthplace of Country Music
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Four Advance from Bristol to TN Songwriters Showcase at The Down Home Feb. 22

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (Feb. 6, 2023) – Four talented songwriters from Saturday’s Tennessee’s Songwriters Week qualifying round at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum are one step closer to possibly landing a dream gig at Nashville’s famed Bluebird Cafe.

Adam Bolt, Melissa Johner, Katie Powderly, and Ron Short holding their trophies under the Birthplace of Country Music Museum sign in the museum's performance theater.
Adam Bolt, Melissa Johner, Katie Powderly, Ron Short. Photo credit: Ashli Linkous, Birthplace of Country Music

Adam Bolt, Abingdon, Va.; Melissa Johner, Marion, Va.; Katie Powderly, Frederick, Md.; and Ron Short, Duffield, Va., will move forward to the next phase of the competition – a Showcase event at The Down Home in Johnson City, Tenn. during Tennessee Songwriters Week. The Showcase will be held at 7:30 p.m. ET, Feb. 22. Once there, they will compete against other qualifiers from venues across the region. Only one songwriter will advance from The Down Home to Nashville and perform with other finalists from across the state.

A total of 61 songwriters entered videos in the Bristol qualifying round, some from as far away as Colorado and Maine. An independent panel narrowed the entries down to 20, but only four could be chosen to advance to the Showcase round.

“The level of artistry from each of the songwriters who performed on Saturday was exceptional,” said Charlene Baker, Communications Manager for the Birthplace of Country Music (BCM). “Our judges had a difficult time narrowing the field down to just four songwriters. It was a great day of music and a tradition I now look forward to every year.”

20 competing songwriters in the 2023 Bristol qualifying round standing under the Birthplace of Country Music Museum sign in the performance theater of the museum.
20 songwriters who competed in the qualifying round at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum Feb. 4. Photo credit: Ashli Linkous, Birthplace of Country Music

The remaining list of songwriters who performed in the Bristol qualifying round are as follows:

Blane Sage | Atkins, Va.
Carrie Brockwell | Chesterfield, Va.
Claire Childress | Big Stone Gap, Va.
Cory Michael Harris | Whitesburg, Ky.
Ella Patrick | Bristol, Va.
Isaac Drummond | Wytheville, Va.
Jamie Collins | Hillsville, Va.
Jonathan Short | Wise, Va.
K. T. Vandyke | Bristol, Va.
Landon Camper | Bristol, Tenn.
Lauren Frihauf | Byers, Colo.
Madison Denhardt | Big Stone Gap, Va.
Noah Spencer | Pounding Mill, Va.
Roger Ramsey | Mountain City, Tenn.
Sam Tayloe | Charlotte, N.C.
Sara Trunzo | Belfast, Maine

The public is invited to attend the Showcase event at The Down Home during Tennessee Songwriters Week to cheer on all the artists that competed in qualifying round venues across our region. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased through the venue’s website at DownHome.com.

Tennessee Songwriters Week supports music venues, songwriters with live performances in all genres of music, drives visitation and inspires travelers to experience the state’s music stories, history, attractions and venues.

The Tennessee Department of Tourist Development partners with The Bluebird Cafe, Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI), Taylor Guitars, and music venues and local convention and visitors’ bureaus, chambers of commerce and partners across the state, all committed to make sure songwriters can share their original work onstage with other writers.

Follow along with Tennessee Songwriters Week by following @tnvacation and #madeinTN, #NowPlayingTN

For a full list of Tennessee Songwriters Week Showcase events across the state, visit TNVacation.com/songwriters-week.

For more information about the Birthplace of Country Music, visit BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org.

More Than $1 Million in Grants Awarded to Birthplace of Country Music Museum Expansion

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (Jan. 12, 2023) – The Birthplace of Country Music (BCM), has been awarded a total of $1,050,000 in grant funding from a number of sources that will help the nonprofit organization move forward on an expansion project for the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, located in Historic Downtown Bristol, Va.-Tenn.

Last week the Virginia Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission approved $500,000 for the BCM expansion as part of its mission to generate economic growth in agriculture and tourism sectors and attract new businesses to Southwest Virginia.

“The funding from the Tobacco Region Revitalization Commission will enable us to move forward on applying for historic and new market tax credits,” said Leah Ross, executive director of advancement for BCM. “Grant funding and tax credits ensures we’ll be able to open with zero debt.”

In December of last year the United States Congress signed the FY 2023 Consolidated Appropriations Act into law. This omnibus included $500,000 of Community Project Funding to assist BCM with the building project.

BCM was also awarded $50,000 from the Genan Foundation, a private philanthropical foundation created in 1987 by the late Anne and Gene Worrell, who owned and operated Worrell Newspapers. The company started in Bristol and eventually purchased the Bristol Herald Courier, then expanded to include more than thirty papers across the country.

The former Automotive Service & Supply building, located next door the museum, was donated to BCM in 2014 by local businessman Joseph R. Gregory and his wife Cindy. The Gregory’s purchased the building from Cecil R. Hopkins, Jr. and his wife Angela. Hopkins’ father founded the United Motor Services parts franchise at that location in 1935.

According to Bristol, Va. tax records, the two-story, 7,800 foot structure, now referred to as the Annex, was constructed in 1881. The application form for downtown’s inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places indicates it was built circa 1900 and used as a grain, feed, fertilizer and cement warehouse. Hopkins confirmed the building later housed the Bristol Motor Company Buick dealership.

BCM plans for the building include a new special exhibit area and climate-controlled archival storage, in addition to adding offices, restrooms and event space. Some work has already been done to shore up the building’s structure and dig an elevator shaft. Once historic and new market tax credits are secured, renovations can begin. The project is expected to take 18 to 24 months to complete once construction starts. The $3.6 million renovation will increase the museum’s size to 41,000 square feet.

For more information about BCM and the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, click here.

BCM January 2023 Newsletter: Happy New Year!

It’s all happening in Bristol, the Birthplace of Country Music, home of the legendary 1927 Bristol Sessions recordings!

To read our official January 2023 Newsletter, click here.
To receive our newsletter on the first of each month in your inbox, click here to subscribe.

Birthplace of Country Music to Host Qualifying Round for 2023 Tennessee Songwriters Week

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (December 15, 2022) – Calling all local songwriters! The Birthplace of Country Music is hosting a qualifying round for the 5th annual Tennessee Songwriters Week competition at 1 p.m. EDT, Feb. 4, 2023, in the performance theater at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, located in Historic Downtown Bristol. Entrants are competing for the chance to perform at The Bluebird Cafe in Nashville. Songwriters may enter now; there is no fee to enter the competition.

Twenty songwriters will be chosen from entries to perform for the judges during the Bristol competition. From there, four semi-finalists will advance to compete in the Tennessee Songwriters Showcase event at The Down Home in Johnson City, Tenn. on Feb. 23. One finalist from The Down Home will be chosen to perform at the legendary Bluebird Cafe, along with five other finalists from across the state.

The public is invited to be part of the audience at the museum to cheer on participants competing in the Bristol event. Tickets for spectators are on sale now for $10. To purchase, visit the Events page at BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org. 

During qualifying, songwriters will perform one original song they wrote or co-wrote. Songwriters must own the rights to the song they will perform. Entrant may sing acapella or have live accompaniment with up to two performers; only light percussion is allowed. Back up tracks are not permitted.

To enter, songwriters must submit their contact information, song lyrics for the song they plan to perform, and a YouTube link to a video of the song they will perform during the competition. Songwriters will be judged based on their overall performance, originality and connection to the audience. Songs deemed inappropriate or inflammatory will not be considered. Songwriters are only permitted to register with one venue during qualifying rounds. Internet access is required to enter, with no purchase necessary. The deadline to enter the qualifying round in Bristol is Jan. 13.

Legal residents of the United States, including the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico qualify to enter. To enter the Tennessee Songwriters Week qualifying round at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, visit the Events page at BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org where you’ll also find complete rules of entry and more details.

Tennessee Songwriters Week supports music venues, songwriters with live performances in all genres of music, drives visitation and inspires travelers to experience the state’s music stories, history, attractions and venues.

The Tennessee Department of Tourist Development partners with The Bluebird Cafe, Nashville Songwriters Association International (NSAI), Taylor Guitars, and music venues and local convention and visitors’ bureaus, chambers of commerce and partners across the state, all committed to make sure songwriters can share their original work onstage with other writers.

Follow along with Tennessee Songwriters Week by following @tnvacation and #madeinTN, #NowPlayingTN

For a full list of qualifying round venues across the state, visit TNVacation.com/songwriters-week.

Located in Historic Downtown Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia, the Birthplace of Country Music is the parent nonprofit of the Birthplace of Country Music Museum (an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution), the annual Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion music festival, and WBCM Radio Bristol, which broadcasts from the museum.

For more information about the Birthplace of Country Music, visit BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org.

BCM Presents Western Centuries at 1927 Concert Series Oct. 14

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (Oct. 3, 2022) – The Birthplace of Country Music presents Seattle-based roots band Western Centuries in concert at 6 p.m. EDT, Oct. 14. The performance is part of the 1927 Concert Series. Catering, an open bar, and a meet-and-greet with the artist are included in the ticket price.

In an age when independence is idolized and every person seems to be seeking their own lone wolf career path, Western Centuries believes that way forward is better together. Collaboration, inspiration and mutual admiration are what the band cites as the heart of their project. Western Centuries celebrates their third album as a “band’s band” with the release of “Call the Captain” – a tongue-in-cheek reference to the band’s lack of hierarchy. Unsurprisingly for such an egalitarian outfit, the collection offers harsh criticism of dogmatic belief systems, all while leading by example with a unique, genre-defying sound.

The 1927 Society Concert Series is an intimate concert experience set in the “acoustically perfect” performance theater at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum. It’s more than a night of music, it is a very personal event with some of the most renowned roots music artists performing today. Guests are asked to arrive at 6 p.m. EDT to enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres and open bar (ages 21+ with valid ID) before the show, which begins at 7 p.m. EDT. The audience will have the opportunity to mingle with the band after the concert, and everything is included in the ticket price. Members of BCM’s 1927 Society are given access to exclusive ticket pre-sales to the series before they go on sale to the public.

Tickets to the 1927 Society Concert Series featuring Western Centuries are $100 and available for purchase online. For tickets and more information about becoming a member of the 1927 Society visit the Events page at BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org.

“Born In Bristol” World Premiere Watch Party in Historic Downtown Bristol July 30

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (July 21, 2022) – In celebration of the 95th anniversary of the 1927 Bristol Sessions, the public is invited to attend the world premiere of “Born in Bristol” at 8 p.m. EDT, July 30. The 1920s-themed, outdoor watch party will be held at the Downtown Center (810 State Street) in Bristol. Festivities kick off with live music by Northfork. The watch party will synchronize at 10 p.m. EDT with Circle Network‘s global premiere.

“We are very excited for ‘Born in Bristol’ to be shared with the world and to celebrate this historic 95th Anniversary,” said Leah Ross, executive director of advancement for the Birthplace of Country Music, the parent nonprofit of the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, the annual Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion music festival, and WBCM Radio Bristol. “Many of our local residents and locations are featured in the docudrama, and we’re thrilled to share the world premiere with our wonderful community.”

The event is free, but the public is asked to RSVP online through the Events page at BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org. Attendees are encouraged to dress in the period of the roaring twenties. Movie concessions and adult beverages will be available for purchase; alcohol will be sold to patrons 21 and over with valid photo ID.

“Born in Bristol,” produced by Tennessee Tourism and Plan A Films, is a 53-minute docudrama profiling the 2015 recording of the “Orthophonic Joy: The 1927 Bristol Sessions Revisited” album project. “Orthophonic Joy” was produced in partnership with Tennessee Tourism and the Virginia Tourism Corporation. The film features interviews with artists including Ashley Campbell, Ashley Monroe, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Eric Church, Marty Stuart, Shannon Campbell, Sheryl Crow, Steve Earle, and Vince Gill, as well as GRAMMY-winning producer Carl Jackson. Cinematic reenactments were shot in several locations in Historic Downtown Bristol.

“Born in Bristol” will premiere globally on Saturday, July 30 10/9c on Circle Network and repeats throughout August. It will also debut on connected devices worldwide on DittyTV on Saturday, July 30 at 8/7c with repeats in August.

The “Born in Bristol” outdoor watch party is presented by the Birthplace of Country Music, in partnership with the City of Bristol, Tennessee, Bristol, Tennessee Parks & Recreation, Believe in Bristol, Explore Bristol, Express AV and Bristol Broadcasting Company. For more information visit the Events page BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org.

“Born In Bristol” Exclusive Global Premiere on Circle Network and DittyTV July 30

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – July 13, 2022 – In celebration of the 95th anniversary of the “Big Bang” of country music, Tennessee Tourism is partnering with Tenn.-based networks Circle and DittyTV to tell the story of country music’s most historic event in a one-hour docudrama, “Born in Bristol.” The special is set to premiere Saturday, July 30 at 10/9c on Circle Network with repeats throughout August.* It will also debut on connected devices worldwide on DittyTV on Saturday, July 30 at 8/7c with repeats in August. The docudrama features cinematic reenactments and new interviews with artists including Ashley Campbell, Ashley Monroe, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris, Eric Church, Marty Stuart, Shannon Campbell, Sheryl Crow, Steve Earle, and Vince Gill, as well as GRAMMY-winning producer Carl Jackson.

“Born in Bristol” relives the pivotal 12 days in 1927 when musicians descended upon the Tennessee-Virginia state line. Those recordings later became known as the “Big Bang” of country music. Musical pioneer Ralph Peer brought hillbilly music to life in a warehouse in Bristol, Tenn., recording such artists as the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers. Country music legend Johnny Cash declared the recordings as the single most important event in country music, responsible for the genre as we know it today.

In 2014, Tennessee Tourism and Virginia Tourism Corporation, in partnership with the Birthplace of Country Music in Bristol, recreated the Bristol Sessions with the release of Orthophonic Joy: The 1927 Bristol Sessions Revisited featuring new recordings of the original songs by modern-day stars including Country Music Hall of Famers Gill, Harris, Parton, and Stuart. The docudrama includes never-before-released interviews and musical outtakes from that historic recording.

The Bristol Sessions influenced modern-day country legends like Eric Church, who stated: “It was the first time it [country music] was recorded, it was documented, and it was the bible of country music. It is still the bible for country music.”

“As a country music musician, it was kind of our genesis,” said Marty Stuart. “The Bristol Sessions was kind of the formal ‘how do you do’ to the world. It absolutely was the blueprint of what country music has become.”

“Those were songs that I grew up with and knowing and it influenced the way I write,” noted Dolly Parton. “But they’re really simple songs – ordinary songs about ordinary people. But they’re told in such a sweet, extraordinary way.”

The special takes viewers into the modern-day studio and all the way back to the warehouse as it may have looked nearly 100 years ago when Ralph Peer convinced 19 acts to let him record their music. Peer created the royalty system that largely is still in place today and brought the world some of its most influential artists of all time.

“What’s so beautiful is to realize that all those years ago…nothing has changed,” noted Vince Gill. “All of us are still moved by a great singer and a great song.”

“If you’re a country music fan, we’re offering you a glimpse into the genesis of the genre as told by some of country music’s most iconic artists,” said Circle Network’s Senior Vice President of Content, Evan Haiman.

Circle Network is dedicated to bringing country music and lifestyle programming to fans across the nation through Opry performances, documentaries, original programming and more. As the home of country programming, Circle Network viewers relish in the stories of country music’s greatest moments – both new and old – and are certain to enjoy learning about the little-known backstory of the 1927 Bristol Sessions in “Born in Bristol.”

Music and history buffs alike can commemorate the 95th anniversary of the recordings with special programming offered by the Smithsonian-affiliated Birthplace of Country Music Museum in Bristol. The museum explores how evolving technology shaped the success of the Bristol Sessions and how its rich musical heritage still thrives in the Appalachian region and beyond. The sessions are celebrated annually during the second week in September at the Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion music festival. Visitors can plan their music adventure at www.ExploreBristol.com.

Tennessee is home to seven genres of music: blues, bluegrass, country, gospel, soul, rockabilly, and rock ‘n’ roll. More songs are written, recorded, and played live in Tennessee than anywhere else in the world. In 2018, Tennessee Tourism launched the Tennessee Music Pathways to connect visitors to the people, places and events that shaped music history. Visitors can trace the origins and plan their own music-inspired journey at www.TNmusicpathways.com.

*EDITOR’S NOTE: “Born in Bristol” repeats Sunday, July 31 at 1 a.m. ET/12 midnight CT on Circle Network, with additional airings throughout August.

BCM’s Leah Ross Earns NETTA Pinnacle for Lifetime Achievement

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (June 10, 2022) – Leah Ross, executive director of advancement for the Birthplace of Country Music (BCM), has earned the Pinnacle Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Northeast Tennessee Tourism Association (NETTA) at the tourism agency’s 25th annual conference June 9, presented by Tennessee Department of Tourist Development and Bristol Motor Speedway. The award is the highest honor presented to an individual or organization that has made a highly significant contribution to the travel and tourism industry in Northeast Tennessee.

Commissioner Mark Ezell posing with Leah Ross, who is holding her Lifetime Achievement Award“A tenacious ambassador for Bristol and the arts, Ross has earned the reputation for rolling up her sleeves and getting the job done, whatever the task,” said Mark Ezell, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development (pictured right with Ross). “She can often be found working in the trenches with volunteers, and she is well-known for her diplomatic skills and for bringing groups together. Her tireless energy and passion for our region and its music culture has parlayed itself into dogged advocacy for our community and the banner success of BCM.”

“You can’t possibly think about the impact of tourism in Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia without thinking about Leah Ross,” said NETTA Executive Director Alicia Phelps. “It takes most people a lifetime to accomplish the milestones she has for our region and the Birthplace of Country Music. The best part is, she’s not done yet. I can think of no one more deserving of this award.”

“I am very humbled to receive this recognition from NETTA,” said Ross. “I stand on the shoulders of a very talented team at BCM, many community leaders, partners, and volunteers, and the individuals and visionaries before me who laid the foundation for what our organization has become. I am so grateful for their hard work and passion for our mission –  without them, none of it would have been possible.”

Ross was among the founding volunteers of Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion since its inception in 2001, and became executive director for the event in 2005. According to an independent economic impact study, the festival brings in an estimated $16.1 million in economic impact to the region. In 2012 the festival merged with the former Birthplace of Country Music Alliance to form BCM with the goal of building a museum honoring the heritage of the 1927 Bristol Sessions. A mere two years later, in August of 2014, the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, opened its doors to the public. WBCM Radio Bristol, which broadcasts from the museum, went on the air in 2015.

Under Ross’ leadership, BCM has earned dozens of tourism and museum industry awards including the Tennessee Arts Commission’s Tennessee Governor’s Arts Leadership Award, plus honors from the International Festivals & Events Association, Southeast Festival & Events Association, Tennessee Association of Museums, NETTA, Southeast Tourism Society, and the American Bus Association.

Ross’ many personal accomplishments include the Industry Leadership Award from NETTA, the Arts Alliance Mountain Empire’s Arts Achievement Award, YWCA Bristol’s Tribute to Women, a service award from the Bristol Convention and Visitors Bureau, and Bristol Motor Speedway’s Extra Mile Award for Volunteerism, to name a few.

BCM team members holding their trophies
(L to R) BCM Team Members Charlene Baker, Communications Manager, Paul Hurt, Managing Director, Leah Ross, Sarah Alexander, Marketing Director, and Danielle Dror of Victory Lap Media.

In addition to Ross’ Lifetime Achievement Award, BCM took home the Pinnacle Award for Event of the Year for the 20th annual Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion music festival and a Pinnacle for Advertising and Promotions, Long Video, for Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion: Celebrating 20 Years in 2021 Episode 4 docuseries episode, produced by Loch & Key Productions of Knoxville, Tennessee. Additionally, Victory Lap Media, a public relations firm based in Asheville, North Carolina and nominated by BCM, took home NETTA’s Pinnacle for Agency of the Year. BCM contracted Victory Lap to help with media and public relations for the organization in 2021.

For more information about the Birthplace of Country Music, visit BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org.

Birthplace of Country Music Names Paula Hurt New Managing Director

Bristol, Tenn./Va. (June 1, 2022) – The board of directors of the Birthplace of Country Music (BCM) today announced Paula Hurt as the nonprofit’s new managing director. In this role, Hurt will report directly to the board and will oversee staff and day-to-day business operations of the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, the annual Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion music festival, and WBCM Radio Bristol.

“After evaluating nearly 90 candidates from all over the U.S., Paula impressed us with her experience, skill set, and interviews,” said Keith Liskey, a BCM board member who served as volunteer Interim managing director during the five month search. “We consider it a tremendous bonus that Paula is from our region and has prior work experience in Bristol. We expect her to be an outstanding leader for the talented and dedicated BCM team.”

“I am thankful to be part of the BCM family and honored to have been entrusted to lead the organization,” said Hurt. “The staff is talented, driven, and resourceful. The board and volunteers are so passionate, welcoming and willing to step up to fulfill the mission of BCM. To be a part of such an excellent team and to contribute to its success moving forward is a priceless opportunity.”

“My passion is for the Bristol community,” Hurt continued. “To think back through the evolution, from U.S. Congress designating Bristol as the birthplace of country music to the growth of the festival and the opening of the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, there is such a sense of pride. It’s a wonderful opportunity to join an organization that celebrates and promotes our beloved music heritage and to educate future generations of Bristol’s impact on the music of today.”

The daughter of a career Marine, Hurt spent much of her youth traveling but calls Elizabethton, Tennessee home base. After graduating from Elizabethton High School, Hurt went on to earn her Bachelor’s of Business Administration from East Tennessee State University with a concentration in accounting. For seven years Hurt acted as purchasing agent for Snap-on Tools, a global producer of quality hand tools. For 19 years Hurt served as vice president of finance and administration for the Bristol Chamber of Commerce and interim president/CEO. During that time, Hurt also coordinated the LEAD Bristol! and Bristol Youth Leadership Programs. For more than five years Hurt served as accounts payable supervisor for AGC Flat Glass North America, a global producer of glass for building projects and automotive use.

Hurt has been a Bristol resident for more than 30 years where she lives with her husband of 31 years, James, who is employed by Sullivan County, Tennessee. Together they have a 26-year-old son, Logan, who works at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Hurt is an avid walker who also enjoys gardening, books, word games and puzzles.

The hire is a result of organizational growth at BCM that includes Leah Ross assuming the new role of executive director of advancement, focusing her talents on government, tourism and music industry relations, and fundraising.

For more information about the Birthplace of Country Music and its mission, click here.

1927 Society Concert ft. Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters May 20

Bristol, Tenn.-Va. (May 5, 2022) – The Birthplace of Country Music proudly presents the return of the 1927 Society Concert Series featuring Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters coming to the Birthplace of Country Music Museum on May 20. The evening will begin at 6:00 p.m. EDT with heavy hors d’oeuvres provided by Catering by Catherine and drinks included in the price of the ticket. Tickets are now on sale to the public.

The music of Asheville, North Carolina-based outfit Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters is nuanced, bringing insight and wit to the stories Platt tells through songwriting. Lyrically driven, the band’s country roots music often inspires introspection, whether it be about life on the road, heartache or hope.

There is an empathetic and charming wit ingrained in Platt’s songwriting. She has a knack for accessing a deep well of emotion and applying it to her story-telling, whether she is writing from her own experiences or immersing herself into the melody of emotions in another person’s life.

Performing along with Platt, The Honeycutters are Matt Smith (pedal steel and electric guitars), Rick Cooper (bass/vocals), Evan Martin (drums/vocals), and Kevin Williams (keys/vocals).

“Platt comes on like some sort of heavenly combination of Kim Richey and Lucinda Williams, using her incisive storytellers’ eye and irresistible way with a country-rock melody to create a jukebox worth of rough-hewn musical gems.” ~ Greenville Journal

The 1927 Society Concert Series is an intimate concert experience set in the “acoustically perfect” performance theater at the Birthplace of Country Music Museum. It’s more than a night of music, it is a very personal event with some of the most renowned roots music artists performing today. Guests are asked to arrive at 6:00 p.m. EDT to enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres and open bar (ages 21+ with valid ID) before the show, which begins at 7:00 p.m. EDT. The audience will have the opportunity to mingle with the band after the concert, and everything is included in the ticket price. Members of BCM’s 1927 Society are given access to exclusive ticket pre-sales to the series before they go on sale to the public.

Tickets to the 1927 Society Concert Series featuring Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters are $100 and available for purchase online. For tickets and more information about becoming a member of the 1927 Society visit the Events page at BirthplaceOfCountryMusic.org.